China praises, blocks Twitter

I opened up TweetDeck this morning to a volley of tweets about China’s new white paper on Internet policy. The paper outlines the history and development of the Internet in China and goes on to pledge that the “Chinese government is determined to unswervingly safeguard the freedom of speech on the Internet enjoyed by Chinese citizens” (as long as this speech is “in accordance with the law,” of course).

#fail
#fail
I opened up TweetDeck this morning to a volley of tweets about China’s new white paper on Internet policy (full text in English, Chinese).

The paper outlines the history and development of the Internet in China and goes on to pledge that the “Chinese government is determined to unswervingly safeguard the freedom of speech on the Internet enjoyed by Chinese citizens” (as long as this speech is “in accordance with the law,” of course).

Hilariously, one of the avenues the document champions for this free speech is Twitter, which has been blocked off and on in China for several years. The Wall Street Journal points out that this may be a translation error, as the Chinese version refers simply to “microblogging,” but still. Awkward.

  • Coolpat

    Well, from what I understand, China hates Plurk even more, given that many politicians of Democratic Progress Party (They favor independence of Taiwan) use Plurk to engage with the networked public sphere. 🙂